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s=”wp image 10370 alignright” src=”http://www.dailyyonder.com/wp content/uploads/2015/12/voting button final 01 760×760.png” alt=”voting button final 01″ width=”250″ height=”250″ />There’s one big national institution that is vital for rural America’s success — but will never become part of this year’s presidential debate. We’re talking about the U.S. Postal Service, that oft maligned and neglected institution that brings us all together. We read Save The Post Office often to see the latest ways the federal government is neglecting this American institution. But just the other day we read an article in the New York Times that reminded us how vital the Postal Service is to the country and especially to rural communities. “I was transported recently to a place that is as enchanting to me as any winter wonderland: my local post office.” So begins an essay by Zeynep Tufekci, an immigrant from Turkey who is enthralled by the “magic of reliable mail service.” When Tufekci came to the U.S., she never dreamed there would be a place like the post office. My goodness, she discovered, a person comes to every house in the country every working day to pick up and deliver stuff. She even learned to trust the mail with her passport. “I told my friends in Turkey about all this,” Tufekci wrote. “They shook their heads in disbelief, wondering how easily I had been recruited as a CIA agent, saying implausibly flattering things about my new country.” (She felt the same way about libraries, those big buildings that lend you a book, again for nothing.) Tufekci soon came to see the connection between prosperity and “infrastructure” like the post office. These are the “least appreciated part of what makes a country strong…”

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Count on High Country News to give a reasonable accounting of the Oregon dustup. Read it here. An occupier walks along a road at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon, Jan. 5, 2016. Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters. An occupier walks along a road at the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon, Jan. 5, 2016. Photo by Jim Urquhart/Reuters.

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