David Tuerck finds that the price of power coming from the Cape Wind project (the one that caused so much turmoil in Nantucket Sound) will cost more than twice as much as power coming from conventional sources.

Nebraska Public Radio’s Fred Knapp has an interesting story on why some counties in his state are gaining shares of young people.

• In other wind news, the Des Moines Register’s Philip Brasher reports that the construction of wind farms has fallen 71 percent across the nation this year “and has disappeared from Iowa.” Some 700 megawatts of capacity was completed in the first half of this year and another 5,000 MW is under construction. “But industry officials say the industry will continue its slowdown unless Congress enacts a national renewable-electricity mandate to reassure investors that there will be a market for additional wind power,” Brasher writes. The most capacity in the first half of the year was added in Texas. 

• Coal company executives “hope to use newly loosened campaign-finance laws to pool their money and defeat Democratic congressional candidates they consider “anti-coal,” including U.S. Senate nominee Jack Conway and U.S. Rep. Ben Chandler in Kentucky,” the Lexington Herald-Leader reports

• The nation’s oldest running family farm (above) is on the market. The Boston Globe reports that Wil Tuttle is selling a New Hampshire farm that has been in his family since 1632. The 134-acre farm is on the market for $3.35 million.

This is a different business now,’’ Goss said. “Farming at any level is a labor of love, but now the future is so uncertain. Looking forward, I don’t see much opportunity for small farms to thrive. It’s a tough grind.’’ 

Gallup reports that the top three states in terms of people’s economic confidence are Iowa, Minnesota and North Dakota. 

 

"> Of Wind, the Nation's Oldest Farm and Economic Confidence in the Midwest - Daily Yonder

Of Wind, the Nation’s Oldest Farm and Economic Confidence in the Midwest

An economist calls it the "great wind power bait and switch." Writing in the Boston Globe, David Tuerck finds that the price of power coming from the Cape Wind project (the one that caused so much turmoil in Nantucket Sound) will cost more than twice as much as power coming from conventional sources.

Nebraska Public Radio's Fred Knapp has an interesting story on why some counties in his state are gaining shares of young people.

• In other wind news, the Des Moines Register's Philip Brasher reports that the construction of wind farms has fallen 71 percent across the nation this year "and has disappeared from Iowa." Some 700 megawatts of capacity was completed in the first half of this year and another 5,000 MW is under construction. "But industry officials say the industry will continue its slowdown unless Congress enacts a national renewable-electricity mandate to reassure investors that there will be a market for additional wind power," Brasher writes. The most capacity in the first half of the year was added in Texas. 

• Coal company executives "hope to use newly loosened campaign-finance laws to pool their money and defeat Democratic congressional candidates they consider "anti-coal," including U.S. Senate nominee Jack Conway and U.S. Rep. Ben Chandler in Kentucky," the Lexington Herald-Leader reports

• The nation's oldest running family farm (above) is on the market. The Boston Globe reports that Wil Tuttle is selling a New Hampshire farm that has been in his family since 1632. The 134-acre farm is on the market for $3.35 million.

This is a different business now,’’ Goss said. “Farming at any level is a labor of love, but now the future is so uncertain. Looking forward, I don’t see much opportunity for small farms to thrive. It’s a tough grind.’’ 

Gallup reports that the top three states in terms of people's economic confidence are Iowa, Minnesota and North Dakota. 

 

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An economist calls it the “great wind power bait and switch.” Writing in the Boston Globe, David Tuerck finds that the price of power coming from the Cape Wind project (the one that caused so much turmoil in Nantucket Sound) will cost more than twice as much as power coming from conventional sources.

Nebraska Public Radio’s Fred Knapp has an interesting story on why some counties in his state are gaining shares of young people.

• In other wind news, the Des Moines Register’s Philip Brasher reports that the construction of wind farms has fallen 71 percent across the nation this year “and has disappeared from Iowa.” Some 700 megawatts of capacity was completed in the first half of this year and another 5,000 MW is under construction. “But industry officials say the industry will continue its slowdown unless Congress enacts a national renewable-electricity mandate to reassure investors that there will be a market for additional wind power,” Brasher writes. The most capacity in the first half of the year was added in Texas. 

• Coal company executives “hope to use newly loosened campaign-finance laws to pool their money and defeat Democratic congressional candidates they consider “anti-coal,” including U.S. Senate nominee Jack Conway and U.S. Rep. Ben Chandler in Kentucky,” the Lexington Herald-Leader reports

• The nation’s oldest running family farm (above) is on the market. The Boston Globe reports that Wil Tuttle is selling a New Hampshire farm that has been in his family since 1632. The 134-acre farm is on the market for $3.35 million.

This is a different business now,’’ Goss said. “Farming at any level is a labor of love, but now the future is so uncertain. Looking forward, I don’t see much opportunity for small farms to thrive. It’s a tough grind.’’ 

Gallup reports that the top three states in terms of people’s economic confidence are Iowa, Minnesota and North Dakota. 

 

 

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