Tom Vilsack was in state over the weekend to talk to dairy farmers. The dairy business is collapsing for farmers. (See Yonder story here.) Vilsack spoke at a dairy town meeting and said his agency was offering more loss assistance money and was making larger purchases of milk and cheese. He supported organic farming, but when Will Stevens, an organic farmer from Shoreham, asked Vilsack about the threat of contamination possed by genetically modified seeds, the Secretary suggested new insurance products and more research. “I’m not going to take sides,” he said later. 

Meanwhile, over in Lowell, Vermont, the town will vote March 2 whether to endorse the state’s largest wind energy project (up to 24 turbines on the ridgeline above). The town is poor and the turbines would provide the area with tax income. Only 530 people will vote, but, hey, it’s Vermont!

According to the Burlington Free Press, “The homes of some opponents display red-and-white posters urging “Vote No!!” and attacking wind power with broad, hyperbolic accusations: ‘Destroying our way of life … killing the wild life … decreased property values … no decrease in utility rates … 750-watt flashing strobe lights.'” 

 

"> Wind and Dairy News From Vermont - Daily Yonder

Wind and Dairy News From Vermont

 

News from Vermont today. First, US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack was in state over the weekend to talk to dairy farmers. The dairy business is collapsing for farmers. (See Yonder story here.) Vilsack spoke at a dairy town meeting and said his agency was offering more loss assistance money and was making larger purchases of milk and cheese. He supported organic farming, but when Will Stevens, an organic farmer from Shoreham, asked Vilsack about the threat of contamination possed by genetically modified seeds, the Secretary suggested new insurance products and more research. "I'm not going to take sides," he said later. 

Meanwhile, over in Lowell, Vermont, the town will vote March 2 whether to endorse the state's largest wind energy project (up to 24 turbines on the ridgeline above). The town is poor and the turbines would provide the area with tax income. Only 530 people will vote, but, hey, it's Vermont!

According to the Burlington Free Press, "The homes of some opponents display red-and-white posters urging “Vote No!!” and attacking wind power with broad, hyperbolic accusations: 'Destroying our way of life ... killing the wild life ... decreased property values ... no decrease in utility rates ... 750-watt flashing strobe lights.'" 

 

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News from Vermont today. First, US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack was in state over the weekend to talk to dairy farmers. The dairy business is collapsing for farmers. (See Yonder story here.) Vilsack spoke at a dairy town meeting and said his agency was offering more loss assistance money and was making larger purchases of milk and cheese. He supported organic farming, but when Will Stevens, an organic farmer from Shoreham, asked Vilsack about the threat of contamination possed by genetically modified seeds, the Secretary suggested new insurance products and more research. “I’m not going to take sides,” he said later. 

Meanwhile, over in Lowell, Vermont, the town will vote March 2 whether to endorse the state’s largest wind energy project (up to 24 turbines on the ridgeline above). The town is poor and the turbines would provide the area with tax income. Only 530 people will vote, but, hey, it’s Vermont!

According to the Burlington Free Press, “The homes of some opponents display red-and-white posters urging “Vote No!!” and attacking wind power with broad, hyperbolic accusations: ‘Destroying our way of life … killing the wild life … decreased property values … no decrease in utility rates … 750-watt flashing strobe lights.'” 

 

 

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