Michael Pollan, the Berkeley professor and author of The Ominivore’s Dilemma, has a long piece in the New York Times today on the failures (so far) to reform the farm bill. Pollan writes that, for the first time, "eaters have spoken" in the farm bill debate — "much to the consternation of farm-state legislators who have fought hard — and at least so far with success — to preserve the status quo." Pollan describes the new politics of farm legislation, one that includes "foodies," and the failures of that movement so far to make meaningful change in a food subsidy system that makes "Twinkies cheaper than carrots and Coca-Cola competitive with water."

"> When Twinkies are Cheaper than Carrots - Daily Yonder

When Twinkies are Cheaper than Carrots

pitchforkMichael Pollan, the Berkeley professor and author of The Ominivore's Dilemma, has a long piece in the New York Times today on the failures (so far) to reform the farm bill. Pollan writes that, for the first time, "eaters have spoken" in the farm bill debate — "much to the consternation of farm-state legislators who have fought hard — and at least so far with success — to preserve the status quo." Pollan describes the new politics of farm legislation, one that includes "foodies," and the failures of that movement so far to make meaningful change in a food subsidy system that makes "Twinkies cheaper than carrots and Coca-Cola competitive with water."

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Michael Pollan, the Berkeley professor and author of The Ominivore's Dilemma, has a long piece in the New York Times today on the failures (so far) to reform the farm bill. Pollan writes that, for the first time, "eaters have spoken" in the farm bill debate — "much to the consternation of farm-state legislators who have fought hard — and at least so far with success — to preserve the status quo." Pollan describes the new politics of farm legislation, one that includes "foodies," and the failures of that movement so far to make meaningful change in a food subsidy system that makes "Twinkies cheaper than carrots and Coca-Cola competitive with water."

 

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