op-ed in the Lexington Herald-Leader
advocates support for the FCC’s plan to reclassify broadband services:
to bring high-speed Internet “under the same common carrier provisions
that have enabled over 95 percent of American households to receive and
afford phone service.”

As the laws now stand, telecommunications companies are not required to
extend broadband service into less profitable localities. This system,
Pickering writes, has left low-income urban areas and many rural
communities with Internet connections too slow to meet their business
and education needs.

Bringing broadband service into line with telephone regulations is part of the FCC’s National Broadband Plan.

"> What Worked for Phone Service Can Work for Broadband - Daily Yonder

What Worked for Phone Service Can Work for Broadband

“The unregulated, market-driven approach to providing broadband has not worked for us.” So writes filmmaker Mimi Pickering of Whitesburg, Kentucky.

Pickering’s op-ed in the Lexington Herald-Leader advocates support for the FCC’s plan to reclassify broadband services: to bring high-speed Internet “under the same common carrier provisions that have enabled over 95 percent of American households to receive and afford phone service.”

As the laws now stand, telecommunications companies are not required to extend broadband service into less profitable localities. This system, Pickering writes, has left low-income urban areas and many rural communities with Internet connections too slow to meet their business and education needs.

Bringing broadband service into line with telephone regulations is part of the FCC’s National Broadband Plan.

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“The unregulated, market-driven approach to providing broadband has not worked for us.” So writes filmmaker Mimi Pickering of Whitesburg, Kentucky.

Pickering’s op-ed in the Lexington Herald-Leader advocates support for the FCC’s plan to reclassify broadband services: to bring high-speed Internet “under the same common carrier provisions that have enabled over 95 percent of American households to receive and afford phone service.”

As the laws now stand, telecommunications companies are not required to extend broadband service into less profitable localities. This system, Pickering writes, has left low-income urban areas and many rural communities with Internet connections too slow to meet their business and education needs.

Bringing broadband service into line with telephone regulations is part of the FCC’s National Broadband Plan.

 

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