Inside Higher Ed reports on findings from the Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering magazine that rural women are making gains in the STEM, science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. For reasons unknown, rural community colleges have much greater success in these areas than their urban counterparts. During the two-decade period from 1985-1986 to 2005-2006, rural community colleges increased the number of women and minority STEM graduates by more than 42 percent. By contrast, urban community colleges boosted these underrepresented groups by just under 24 percent and suburban community colleges by about 10 percent.

"> More STEM degrees for rural women and minorities - Daily Yonder

More STEM degrees for rural women and minorities

Inside Higher Ed reports on findings from the Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering magazine that rural women are making gains in the STEM, science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. For reasons unknown, rural community colleges have much greater success in these areas than their urban counterparts. During the two-decade period from 1985-1986 to 2005-2006, rural community colleges increased the number of women and minority STEM graduates by more than 42 percent. By contrast, urban community colleges boosted these underrepresented groups by just under 24 percent and suburban community colleges by about 10 percent.

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Inside Higher Ed reports on findings from the Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering magazine that rural women are making gains in the STEM, science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. For reasons unknown, rural community colleges have much greater success in these areas than their urban counterparts. During the two-decade period from 1985-1986 to 2005-2006, rural community colleges increased the number of women and minority STEM graduates by more than 42 percent. By contrast, urban community colleges boosted these underrepresented groups by just under 24 percent and suburban community colleges by about 10 percent.

 

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