According to the BBC, there are up to 1.5 million homes in the United Kingdom that can’t get adequate broadband. 

This BBC story has some interesting examples of how rural communities are coping with limited broadband access. In the village of Wray in Lancashire, farmers depend on a constricted broadband access for access to markets and government regulations and programs. “There’s a rule there – an agreement that we all sign. So the kids know there’s no gaming, no YouTube and iPlayer until after 5pm when the businesses have closed for the day and then it’s a free for all,” said Chris Conder. “Some nights it can go slow… but it’s the best we can do at the moment.” Conder has laid over a kilometer of fiber optic cable to hook up some neighbors to the network.

And on the Isle of Raasay, Paul Camilli (above) uses satellite. “It isn’t by any means perfect, connection occasionally drops out and upload speeds can be pretty grim, but compared with what I was used to it’s fantastic really,” Mr Camilli said.”Communication’s always been a problem. For many years I didn’t even have a phone.”

"> Rural Britain Pushes for Broadband - Daily Yonder

Rural Britain Pushes for Broadband

The push is on to provide broadband connections to rural homes — and not just in the U.S. The Country Land and Business Association is lobbying the British government to help rural homes that are unable to get broadband. According to the BBC, there are up to 1.5 million homes in the United Kingdom that can't get adequate broadband. 

This BBC story has some interesting examples of how rural communities are coping with limited broadband access. In the village of Wray in Lancashire, farmers depend on a constricted broadband access for access to markets and government regulations and programs. "There's a rule there - an agreement that we all sign. So the kids know there's no gaming, no YouTube and iPlayer until after 5pm when the businesses have closed for the day and then it's a free for all," said Chris Conder. "Some nights it can go slow... but it's the best we can do at the moment." Conder has laid over a kilometer of fiber optic cable to hook up some neighbors to the network.

And on the Isle of Raasay, Paul Camilli (above) uses satellite. "It isn't by any means perfect, connection occasionally drops out and upload speeds can be pretty grim, but compared with what I was used to it's fantastic really," Mr Camilli said."Communication's always been a problem. For many years I didn't even have a phone."

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The push is on to provide broadband connections to rural homes — and not just in the U.S. The Country Land and Business Association is lobbying the British government to help rural homes that are unable to get broadband. According to the BBC, there are up to 1.5 million homes in the United Kingdom that can’t get adequate broadband. 

This BBC story has some interesting examples of how rural communities are coping with limited broadband access. In the village of Wray in Lancashire, farmers depend on a constricted broadband access for access to markets and government regulations and programs. “There’s a rule there – an agreement that we all sign. So the kids know there’s no gaming, no YouTube and iPlayer until after 5pm when the businesses have closed for the day and then it’s a free for all,” said Chris Conder. “Some nights it can go slow… but it’s the best we can do at the moment.” Conder has laid over a kilometer of fiber optic cable to hook up some neighbors to the network.

And on the Isle of Raasay, Paul Camilli (above) uses satellite. “It isn’t by any means perfect, connection occasionally drops out and upload speeds can be pretty grim, but compared with what I was used to it’s fantastic really,” Mr Camilli said.”Communication’s always been a problem. For many years I didn’t even have a phone.”

 

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