reservation crime

Of the eight U.S. Attorneys fired by the Bush Administration’s Department of Justice, five were active in prosecuting crimes on Native American reservations. The two are connected, according to the Denver Post.

The newspaper is running a series, “Lawless Lands,” about the administration of justice on the rez. Rather, the lack of justice on reservation lands. Terrible crimes go unpunished because, by federal law, busy U.S. Attorneys are the only officials allowed to prosecute on Indian lands. When some Republican attorneys were thought to have spent too much time on Indian affairs, they were fired.

As a result, reservations are “facing a steep rise in meth-fueled crime, the country's Indian reservations are also plagued by a systematic breakdown in the delivery of justice”¦” The three-day series begins here.

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Reservation Crime Goes Unpunished

 

reservation crime
Of the eight U.S. Attorneys fired by the Bush Administration's Department of Justice, five were active in prosecuting crimes on Native American reservations. The two are connected, according to the Denver Post.

The newspaper is running a series, "Lawless Lands," about the administration of justice on the rez. Rather, the lack of justice on reservation lands. Terrible crimes go unpunished because, by federal law, busy U.S. Attorneys are the only officials allowed to prosecute on Indian lands. When some Republican attorneys were thought to have spent too much time on Indian affairs, they were fired.

As a result, reservations are "facing a steep rise in meth-fueled crime, the country's Indian reservations are also plagued by a systematic breakdown in the delivery of justice"¦" The three-day series begins here.

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Of the eight U.S. Attorneys fired by the Bush Administration’s Department of Justice, five were active in prosecuting crimes on Native American reservations. The two are connected, according to the Denver Post.

The newspaper is running a series, “Lawless Lands,” about the administration of justice on the rez. Rather, the lack of justice on reservation lands. Terrible crimes go unpunished because, by federal law, busy U.S. Attorneys are the only officials allowed to prosecute on Indian lands. When some Republican attorneys were thought to have spent too much time on Indian affairs, they were fired.

As a result, reservations are “facing a steep rise in meth-fueled crime (and) the country's Indian reservations are also plagued by a systematic breakdown in the delivery of justice”¦” The three-day series begins here.

 

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