Swickard 150

“It shocked the industry,” says Brett Matzke, a self-avowed “fish kisser.” Matzke was referring to the cattle industry and “Cowboy Unite” — a collaboration of ranchers (like Todd Swickard, above), enviromentalists, and federal agencies. These age-old combattants agreed to work together to improve cattle management in the Plumas National Forest and bring back the fragile creek that runs through it. And they’re succeeding.

Two media pros now present the compelling story of “Cowboy Unite” and other true tales of rural California via Saving the Sierra Radio. The project, led by Catherine Sifter and jesikah maria ross, lets top notch radio features prove what federal forestry officials, residents, cattlemen, and environmentalists like Matzke (a trout conservationist) all want and how many long-range interests they share.

As Sifter writes in the latest edition of Sierra Citizen, the goal is to “make downstream communities more aware of conservation issues at the top of their watersheds, and motivate greater involvement throughout the state.” How do you do that? Writes Sifter, by airing “real rural voices.”

Did you think bringing fish kissers and cow punchers together was impossible? Listen in for lots more shockers.

"> One Shocking Story at a Time: Saving the Sierra - Daily Yonder

One Shocking Story at a Time: Saving the Sierra

Swickard 150

"It shocked the industry," says Brett Matzke, a self-avowed "fish kisser." Matzke was referring to the cattle industry and "Cowboy Unite" -- a collaboration of ranchers (like Todd Swickard, above), enviromentalists, and federal agencies. These age-old combattants agreed to work together to improve cattle management in the Plumas National Forest and bring back the fragile creek that runs through it. And they're succeeding.

Two media pros now present the compelling story of "Cowboy Unite" and other true tales of rural California via Saving the Sierra Radio. The project, led by Catherine Sifter and jesikah maria ross, lets top notch radio features prove what federal forestry officials, residents, cattlemen, and environmentalists like Matzke (a trout conservationist) all want and how many long-range interests they share.

As Sifter writes in the latest edition of Sierra Citizen, the goal is to "make downstream communities more aware of conservation issues at the top of their watersheds, and motivate greater involvement throughout the state." How do you do that? Writes Sifter, by airing "real rural voices."

Did you think bringing fish kissers and cow punchers together was impossible? Listen in for lots more shockers.

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Swickard 150

“It shocked the industry,” says Brett Matzke, a self-avowed “fish kisser.” Matzke was referring to the cattle industry and “Cowboy Unite” — a collaboration of ranchers (like Todd Swickard, above), enviromentalists, and federal agencies. These age-old combattants agreed to work together to improve cattle management in California’s Plumas National Forest and bring back the fragile creek that runs through it. And they’re succeeding.

Two media pros now present the compelling story of “Cowboy Unite” and other true tales of rural California via Saving the Sierra Radio. The project, led by Catherine Sifter and jesikah maria ross, lets top notch radio-features reveal what federal forestry officials, residents, cattlemen, and environmentalists like Matzke (a trout conservationist) all want and how many long-range interests they share.

As Sifter writes in the latest edition of Sierra Citizen, the goal is to “make downstream communities more aware of conservation issues at the top of their watersheds, and motivate greater involvement throughout the state.” How do you do that? Writes Sifter, by airing “real rural voices.”

Did you think bringing fish kissers and cow punchers together was impossible? Listen in for lots more shockers.

 

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