Minn capitol

Keeping their health care is the primary concern of rural Minnesotans, according to a poll just released by Minnesota 2020, a nonpartisan research group. Forty percent of non-metro voters listed health care as their top concern. Jobs and the economy polled at 39 percent, education at 35 percent, taxes at 34 percent, according to a story in the Bemidji Pioneer.

A little over half the rural residents contacted by the poll-takers believed problems in rural Minnesota were unique to non-metro areas. There was a sense among rural residents that those in the state capital don't understand their problems. Those in northern Minnesota were more inclined to think St. Paul was out of touch with rural communities.

Only 19 percent of rural residents believed they would be better off financially a year from now.

"> Health Care is Greatest Rural Concern - Daily Yonder

Health Care is Greatest Rural Concern

Minn capitol
Keeping their health care is the primary concern of rural Minnesotans, according to a poll just released by Minnesota 2020, a nonpartisan research group. Forty percent of non-metro voters listed health care as their top concern. Jobs and the economy polled at 39 percent, education at 35 percent, taxes at 34 percent, according to a story in the Bemidji Pioneer.

A little over half the rural residents contacted by the poll-takers believed problems in rural Minnesota were unique to non-metro areas. There was a sense among rural residents that those in the state capital don't understand their problems. Those in northern Minnesota were more inclined to think St. Paul was out of touch with rural communities.

Only 19 percent of rural residents believed they would be better off financially a year from now.

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Minn capitol

Keeping their health care is the primary concern of rural Minnesotans, according to a poll just released by Minnesota 2020, a nonpartisan research group. Forty percent of non-metro voters listed health care as their top concern. Jobs and the economy polled at 39 percent, education at 35 percent, taxes at 34 percent, according to a story in the Bemidji Pioneer.

A little over half the rural residents contacted by the poll-takers believed problems in rural Minnesota were unique to non-metro areas. There was a sense among rural residents that those in the state capital don't understand their problems. Those in northern Minnesota were more inclined to think St. Paul was out of touch with rural communities.

Only 19 percent of rural residents believed they would be better off financially a year from now.

 

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