story in the Boston Globe. 

Well, it is summer and time for the annual stories about Jaws threats. Warmer water temperatures and lots of fresh seal meat will be perfect for the great whites. Not good for the seals — or for beach combers. Oh, a good sign that a great white might be in the area, according to officials, is when “we have some seal carcasses washing up.” Yep, that would be an indication…

AP writer Betsy Blaney reports on an old story — the decline of the small town grocery. Blaney reports that this “long-running trend e University backed up that belief, finding that more than 38 percent of the 213 groceries in Kansas towns of less than 2,500 closed between 2006 and 2009.” 

The problem is that people don’t mind driving the extra miles to shop at Wal-Mart or Target at larger cities. Small town groceries also have a hard time getting restocked. One grocery owner said he had to meet his bread distributor at a Sam’s Club parking lot in Lubbock.

Blaney reports on some efforts to re-start groceries in small towns. The USDA has some money for such projects.

(The beauty above is Marshall’s Corner Store in Cotton, GA, photographed by Brian Brown.)

 

"> Of Great Whites and Local Groceries - Daily Yonder

Of Great Whites and Local Groceries

Two stories caught our eye this morning. The first comes from Cape Cod, where an abundance of seals may attract great white sharks to Massachusetts beaches this summer, according to a story in the Boston Globe. 

Well, it is summer and time for the annual stories about Jaws threats. Warmer water temperatures and lots of fresh seal meat will be perfect for the great whites. Not good for the seals — or for beach combers. Oh, a good sign that a great white might be in the area, according to officials, is when "we have some seal carcasses washing up." Yep, that would be an indication...

AP writer Betsy Blaney reports on an old story — the decline of the small town grocery. Blaney reports that this "long-running trend e University backed up that belief, finding that more than 38 percent of the 213 groceries in Kansas towns of less than 2,500 closed between 2006 and 2009." 

The problem is that people don't mind driving the extra miles to shop at Wal-Mart or Target at larger cities. Small town groceries also have a hard time getting restocked. One grocery owner said he had to meet his bread distributor at a Sam's Club parking lot in Lubbock.

Blaney reports on some efforts to re-start groceries in small towns. The USDA has some money for such projects.

(The beauty above is Marshall's Corner Store in Cotton, GA, photographed by Brian Brown.)

 

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Two stories caught our eye this morning. The first comes from Cape Cod, where an abundance of seals may attract great white sharks to Massachusetts beaches this summer, according to a story in the Boston Globe. 

Well, it is summer and time for the annual stories about Jaws threats. Warmer water temperatures and lots of fresh seal meat will be perfect for the great whites. Not good for the seals — or for beach combers. Oh, a good sign that a great white might be in the area, according to officials, is when “we have some seal carcasses washing up.” Yep, that would be an indication…

AP writer Betsy Blaney reports on an old story — the decline of the small town grocery. Blaney reports that this “long-running trend e University backed up that belief, finding that more than 38 percent of the 213 groceries in Kansas towns of less than 2,500 closed between 2006 and 2009.” 

The problem is that people don’t mind driving the extra miles to shop at Wal-Mart or Target at larger cities. Small town groceries also have a hard time getting restocked. One grocery owner said he had to meet his bread distributor at a Sam’s Club parking lot in Lubbock.

Blaney reports on some efforts to re-start groceries in small towns. The USDA has some money for such projects.

(The beauty above is Marshall’s Corner Store in Cotton, GA, photographed by Brian Brown.)

 

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