Time Magazine has picked up on the raw milk movement that has been building among urban consumers. One woman drives two hours to upstate New York each month to pick up a supply of raw milk. Another has bought shares in a dairy farm to insure her raw milk take. "In Manhattan," the magazine reports, "some raw-milk drinkers hire a mule to bring the white stuff to an agreed-upon location in the city, where they stock up during a strictly enforced two-hour window."

The Food and Drug Administration since 1987 has required all milk sold across state lines to be pasteurized. Only six states allow raw milk to be sold at stores while 28 allow sales of raw milk straight off the farm. This is not meeting the demands of those who believe that regularly drinking raw milk can relieve asthma and eczema.

All the health experts contend drinking raw milk is not the greatest of ideas. But people want it and dairy farmers are finding it a lucrative product.

"> Got (Raw) Milk? - Daily Yonder

Got (Raw) Milk?

Time Magazine has picked up on the raw milk movement that has been building among urban consumers. One woman drives two hours to upstate New York each month to pick up a supply of raw milk. Another has bought shares in a dairy farm to insure her raw milk take. "In Manhattan," the magazine reports, "some raw-milk drinkers hire a mule to bring the white stuff to an agreed-upon location in the city, where they stock up during a strictly enforced two-hour window."

The Food and Drug Administration since 1987 has required all milk sold across state lines to be pasteurized. Only six states allow raw milk to be sold at stores while 28 allow sales of raw milk straight off the farm. This is not meeting the demands of those who believe that regularly drinking raw milk can relieve asthma and eczema.

All the health experts contend drinking raw milk is not the greatest of ideas. But people want it and dairy farmers are finding it a lucrative product.

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Time Magazine has picked up on the raw milk movement that has been building among urban consumers. One woman drives two hours to upstate New York each month to pick up a supply of raw milk. Another has bought shares in a dairy farm to insure her raw milk take. "In Manhattan," the magazine reports, "some raw-milk drinkers hire a mule to bring the white stuff to an agreed-upon location in the city, where they stock up during a strictly enforced two-hour window."

The Food and Drug Administration since 1987 has required all milk sold across state lines to be pasteurized. Only six states allow raw milk to be sold at stores while 28 allow sales of raw milk straight off the farm. This is not meeting the demands of those who believe that regularly drinking raw milk can relieve asthma and eczema.

All the health experts contend drinking raw milk is not the greatest of ideas. But people want it and dairy farmers are finding it a lucrative product.

 

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