The National Congress of American Indians has announced their purchase of a building in Washington D. C. that will house its offices as well as an Embassy of Tribal Nations.  According to NCAI President Joe Garcia, the Embassy will send a message to congress and federal agencies that tribal nations are serious about working closely with them.
NCAI began a funding campaign five years ago for the Embassy with the hope of securing a space for tribal leaders to meet and talk about important issues in Indian Country.
Tribes and individual donors have contributed to the ongoing campaign including the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community and Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation that each gave $1million. The building at 1514 P Street NW was listed on a real estate website for $8.5 million.

NCAI will move its offices into the building by the end of the month. Information on a grand opening will be announced soon.

"> Embassy of Tribal Nations a Reality - Daily Yonder

Embassy of Tribal Nations a Reality

The National Congress of American Indians has announced their purchase of a building in Washington D. C. that will house its offices as well as an Embassy of Tribal Nations.  According to NCAI President Joe Garcia, the Embassy will send a message to congress and federal agencies that tribal nations are serious about working closely with them.
NCAI began a funding campaign five years ago for the Embassy with the hope of securing a space for tribal leaders to meet and talk about important issues in Indian Country.
Tribes and individual donors have contributed to the ongoing campaign including the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community and Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation that each gave $1million. The building at 1514 P Street NW was listed on a real estate website for $8.5 million.

NCAI will move its offices into the building by the end of the month. Information on a grand opening will be announced soon.

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The National Congress of American Indians has announced their purchase of a building in Washington D. C. that will house its offices as well as an Embassy of Tribal Nations.  According to NCAI President Joe Garcia, the Embassy will send a message to congress and federal agencies that tribal nations are serious about working closely with them.

NCAI began a funding campaign five years ago for the Embassy with the hope of securing a space for tribal leaders to meet and talk about important issues in Indian Country.
Tribes and individual donors have contributed to the ongoing campaign including the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community and Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation that each gave $1million. The building at 1514 P Street NW was listed on a real estate website for $8.5 million.

NCAI will move its offices into the building by the end of the month. Information on a grand opening will be announced soon.

 

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