increase the frequency of inspections at meat processing plants. The union representing food inspectors in Canada said their members were inspecting plants every 16 hours of operation. U.S. safety standards call for 12-hour intervals. Canada has been paying overtime since November to comply with the U.S. standard.

There have been several problems with tainted meat recently coming from Canadian plants. (U.S. facilities have had their problems, too.) The new inspection plan will comply with U.S. regulations. The additional inspections “will allow us to better meet the USDA’s technical requirements for products exported to the U.S.,” according to a Canadian official.

"> Canadians Increase Frequency of Meat Inspections - Daily Yonder

Canadians Increase Frequency of Meat Inspections

Under pressure from the U.S., the Canadian government has agreed to increase the frequency of inspections at meat processing plants. The union representing food inspectors in Canada said their members were inspecting plants every 16 hours of operation. U.S. safety standards call for 12-hour intervals. Canada has been paying overtime since November to comply with the U.S. standard.

There have been several problems with tainted meat recently coming from Canadian plants. (U.S. facilities have had their problems, too.) The new inspection plan will comply with U.S. regulations. The additional inspections “will allow us to better meet the USDA’s technical requirements for products exported to the U.S.,” according to a Canadian official.

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Under pressure from the U.S., the Canadian government has agreed to increase the frequency of inspections at meat processing plants. The union representing food inspectors in Canada said their members were inspecting plants every 16 hours of operation. U.S. safety standards call for 12-hour intervals. Canada has been paying overtime since November to comply with the U.S. standard.

There have been several problems with tainted meat recently coming from Canadian plants. (U.S. facilities have had their problems, too.) The new inspection plan will comply with U.S. regulations. The additional inspections “will allow us to better meet the USDA’s technical requirements for products exported to the U.S.,” according to a Canadian official.

 

Topics: Food
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